A Book Puzzle (Fun Fun Fun!)

Question: What do the following three things have in common?

……….1) The art and drug scenes in Brazil

……….2) China’s frantically developing car culture

……….3) Imprisoned Iranian-American journalists

Answer: Absolutely nothing. But they’re the topics for three brand new nonfiction books that are really Hot. Right. Now. at your San Diego County Library! Check out the three popular titles below and let us know what you think!
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At a time when interest in Brazilian culture has reached an all-time high, and the stories of one person’s ability to improve the lives of others has captured so many hearts, Culture is our Weapon : Making Music and Changing Lives in Rio de Janeiro takes readers to the frontlines of a battle raging over control of the nation’s poorest areas. Culture Is Our Weapon tells the story of Grupo Cultural AfroReggae, a Rio-based organization employing music and an appreciation for black culture to inspire residents of the favelas, or shantytowns, to resist the drugs that are ruining their neighborhoods. This is an inspiring look at an artistic explosion and the best and worst of Brazilian society. (From publisher)
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In Country Driving : A Journey Through China From Farm to Factory, New Yorker writer Peter Hessler  again proves himself America’s keenest observer of the New China. In an epic road trip following the Great Wall across northern China, he surveys dilapidated frontier outposts from the imperial past while barely surviving the advent of the nation’s uniquely terrifying car culture. He probes the transformation of village life through the saga of a family of peasants trying to remake themselves as middle-class entrepreneurs. Finally, he explores China’s frantic industrialization, embodied by the managers and workers at a fly-by-night bra-parts factory in a Special Economic Zone. Hessler has a sharp eye for contradictions, from the absurdities of Chinese drivers’ education courses—low-speed obstacle courses are mandatory, while seat belts and turn signals are deemed optional—to the leveling of an entire mountain to make way for the Renli Environmental Protection Company. Better yet, he has a knack for finding the human-scale stories that make China’s vast upheavals both comprehensible and moving. The result is a fascinating portrait of a society tearing off into the future with only the sketchiest of maps. (PW)
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On the morning of January 31, 2009, Roxana Saberi, an Iranian-American journalist working in Iran, was forced from her home by four men and secretly detained in Iran’s notorious Evin Prison. The intelligence agents who captured her accused her of espionage—a charge she denied. After a sham trial that made headlines around the world, the thirty-one-year-old reporter was sentenced to eight years in prison. But following international pressure by family, friends, colleagues, various governments, and total strangers, she was released on appeal on May 11, 2009.

In Between Two Worlds : My Life and Captivity in Iran Saberi writes movingly of her imprisonment, her trial, her eventual release, and the faith that helped her through it all. Her recollections are interwoven with insights into Iranian society, the Islamic regime, and U.S.-Iran relations, as well as stories of her fellow prisoners—many of whom were jailed for their pursuit of human rights, including freedom of speech, association, and religion. Saberi gains strength and wisdom from her cellmates who support her throughout a grueling hunger strike and remind her of the humanity that remains, even when they are denied the most basic rights. (From publisher)
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This entry was posted in non-fiction and tagged , , , by Steven Deineh. Bookmark the permalink.

About Steven Deineh

Steven is a librarian at San Diego County Library headquarters. He mostly enjoys reading young adult fiction (some of his favorites include Feed by M.T. Anderson, Boy Meets Boy by David Levithan, The Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling), science fiction/fantasy (Ender's Game & series by Orson Scott Card, The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke), and fiction (anything by Sarah Waters, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon, Bel Canto by Ann Patchett). When not reading, you can find him sleeping, drinking coffee, and wanderlusting all over San Diego County and the world.

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